Which postures are connected to which meridians?

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toaster
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Which postures are connected to which meridians?

Post by toaster »

I know that in Bernie's book, the section on Yin Yoga Asanas mentions which meridians and organs are affected. I am wondering of I can access a summary--on this web site or elsewhere--which provides a list of yin poses organized by organs/meridians.

For example, something like:

Gall Bladder = a, b, c
Stomach = x, y, z

Etc.

Does this make sense? Is it useful to plan sequences this way?
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Bernie
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Post by Bernie »

I have not seen a specific table that looks like what you are suggesting, but there are flows that target certain meridian lines. For example A Flow for the Kidneys or A Flow for the Liver list postures that work those lines. You can find these flows on this site (click the links) or in my book The Complete Guide to Yin Yoga. Sarah Powers' book Insight Yoga also has flows that target all the meridians: from these, it should be easy to extract a cross-reference table that you want. Cheers! Bernie
toaster
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Location: Upstate New York

Post by toaster »

Bernie, I saw your reply after you posted it, and I apologize for not thanking you sooner (got distracted!). Thank you for those links; I will check them out. One of the reasons I was asking is because I am working with a naturopath who has suggested that certain health conditions I have (migraines, thyroid problems, etc.) might relate to certain meridians, and therefore I was wondering if a yin practice focused on these specific meridians might be beneficial.
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Bernie
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Post by Bernie »

The best (and safest) way to figure out the answer to your question is to see a traditional Chinese medicine doctor. He or she can give you better and more pertinent advice: I could say that the Urinary Bladder can help with headaches, but that is not the case for everybody and every headache. It depends on what is causing the problem. Before prescribing any medicine, have clear in your mind what the cause is, other wise you are just randomly trying things that could do more harm than good.

I am sure a Yin Yoga practice can be beneficial, but which practice? I can't advise on that without knowing a lot more, and even then, I am not a therapist or a doctor.

Good luck with your investigations
Bernie
toaster
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Post by toaster »

Thanks Bernie for your additional thoughts. I actually began practice yoga years ago (not yin specifically) in the hopes that it would help with my migraines, and it hasn't, really (maybe it's stopped them from getting worse)--but I fell in love with yoga, and now I'm a teacher! I'm somewhat of the mindset that my migraines are highly genetic and not likely to change significantly until I go through menopause (which is what happened with my mom), yet at the same time, I'm always willing to try anything that might help.
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Bernie
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Post by Bernie »

I assume you have done the normal checks: is it food? Too much caffeine, too much ripe cheese, etc can cause migraines. Too much computer light (too blue) can also be a trigger. Etc...

Since you have had these for a while, I am sure you have checked them all out. If nothing else has worked, indeed try acupuncture or other Chinese remedies. Why not...but talk to a qualified practitioner.

Good luck! If you do find a solution that even reduces the severity or frequency, let us know.
toaster
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Post by toaster »

Oh, yes--I'm sorry, I didn't think anyone would be interested in my whole treatment history. But yes, I've worked with various doctors and several neurologists over the years. I have no clear triggers, which is frustrating in and of itself. (The exceptions are hormones, as my migraines are MUCH worse around the onset of my period, but continuous birth control has helped with that, and alcohol, which sometimes is a trigger, sometimes not--and I get migraines frequently yet rarely drink.)

The naturopath I am seeing now is a trained acupuncturist; that's one of the main reasons I started seeing her. I have had 3 treatments since right before Christmas. I had almost no migraines after the first 2x but then seemed to be on a bad patch after #3. We'll see what happens after I return in another 2 weeks.
Visit me on Facebook! YogiBethC ~ YogiPhD
Bernie
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Post by Bernie »

Good luck!
dave
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Post by dave »

Back in the good old days there was no modern medicine. In India a person would go to the yoga doctor. Yoga wasn't downward dog back then.

Matsyasana the destroyer of all diseases http://yogashaastra.blogspot.ca/2010/02 ... vical.html. I think it is suppose to be done after shoulder stand and plow pose as well. A person would need more than one posture. A program would be put together for the individual. Just doing something probably won't work. It has to be done wisely. This comment here is so you can explore other possible options.
Bernie
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Post by Bernie »

It is interesting that you say that, Dave. My understanding is that ancient yoga was not medicine, but a spiritual practice. The ancient Indian medicine was called Ayurveda and was quite distinct from yoga. Today, however, we have mixed it all up and yoga is more about health and far less about mediation and liberation. Some the ancient Samkhya and Classical yogis were not trying to heal their bodies, but get out of their bodies, as fast as possible. The fasting ascetic Jain monk was not trying to get healthier: he practiced a fierce form of yoga with sometimes fatal consequences. It was when Tantra came along that people thought yoga could be use to heal their bodies, but again in service to their spiritual practice.

I have heard that Padmasana was the destroyer of all disease (Hatha yoga pradipika), but regardless...there was a lot of hyperbole in those old books. (No truth in advertising laws.) But, you are right--the practice was tailored for the individual by his guru, and even then, the medicine wouldn't work for every body.

Cheers
Bernie
dave
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Post by dave »

"The more I get to see the less I understand"

As far as using the word disease; when old languages are changed into modern ones, English, the words and meanings often get messed up. It could have easily been a specific disease or disorder but in English just became the word disease, a general term.
Bernie
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Post by Bernie »

That's a good point. I don't speak Sanskrit so have no idea how many other interpretations of the word there could be. But, I still think it was oversold. ;-)
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