Welcome to the Yin Yoga Forum

 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

"Too much of a good thing"

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    YinYoga.com Forum Index -> General Yin Yoga Topics
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Renee



Joined: 08 Sep 2011
Posts: 47
Location: geldrop

PostPosted: Thu Jan 05, 2012 8:35 pm    Post subject: "Too much of a good thing" Reply with quote

Hello again,

I can still hear Paul Grilley saying "you can have too much of a good thing". I have one student who has had too much of that good thing, I guess, because now she is suffering backpain. She has been doing yinyoga day after day, for hours at a time. What kind of injury can one think of when doing too much yin. Tear ligaments?
I feel so bad for her that in her enthusiasm for yin she suffers from a serious backache.
Thanks again,
Rene
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Bernie



Joined: 23 Sep 2006
Posts: 1073
Location: Vancouver

PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2012 4:55 am    Post subject: Too much! Reply with quote

Paul is right: you can do too much of anything. Sarah Powers has another saying, "people tend to do what they like, not what they need." I personally fell in love with the Seal and would do it for almost an hour every day, until I started to get tingling pains in my lower back. I was doing too much. Paul also fell in love with the Snail pose and over did it.

Perhaps you can recommend to your student the article I wrote a while back talking about the Goldilocks' position: not too much and not too little. Where this is is unique for every body, and with practice she will be able to hear when her body tells her to back off or go deeper.

I can't diagnose her injury remotely: she could have done many different things to her connective tissues - tearing is quite possible. Have her take it easy until she is healed.

Cheers
Bernie
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Renee



Joined: 08 Sep 2011
Posts: 47
Location: geldrop

PostPosted: Sat Jan 14, 2012 9:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Bernie,

My student went to this doctor whose treatment is called, 'muscle-jointology' (translated). He told her that her right iliopsoas was very much shortened. His treatment is to manually seperate the affected joints in the spinal colomn to release the pressure on the nerves.
This is a unique method he says. I have a funny feeling when I read his site. What do you think of this treatment and have you heard of this before? Since there is no way that discs slip, can one seperate vertebral bodies by hand?
I am a bit worried.
Sorry, I know it is hard for you to react. Right now she is on her way for her second treatment, her situation is as bad, forward bending still painful...
Thanks so much for your time, Bernie.
Have a nice day.
Rene
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Renee



Joined: 08 Sep 2011
Posts: 47
Location: geldrop

PostPosted: Mon Jan 16, 2012 6:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My student had her second treatment a few days ago and this morning she told me that her condition is still bad. This doctor told her that she suffers from one very tight iliopsoas muscle. He also said that yoga tends to shorten the iliopsoas. Question So my concern gets bigger now...
After looking for some similar cases I think she might suffer from spondylolisthesis. ( the same condition that my student thinks she suffers from after googling) Could the excessive yinyoga she did got her in this condition? And what can I advice her to do?
She will be going for her third treatment in three days and I am so doubting that treatment.
Hope my feeling is wrong and that ultimately that doctor will help her.
Thanks, Bernie
Rene
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Bernie



Joined: 23 Sep 2006
Posts: 1073
Location: Vancouver

PostPosted: Tue Jan 17, 2012 5:57 am    Post subject: A tight iliopsoas? Reply with quote

Hi Rene

How strange to think that yoga could tighten just one iliopsoas and not the other? Maybe, but her yang yoga practice would have had to have been very asymmetric and surely her teachers would have noticed. If all the yoga she had been doing was Yin Yoga, it is very doubtful that yoga would have caused her iliopsoas to shorten - Yin Yoga doesn't target that muscle. In any case, her real concern is the pain she is experiencing in her back, so let's look at that.

If her pain is being caused by a short iliopsoas, which in turn pulled the lumber vertebra out of alignment, then it seems obvious that her therapy should be focused on lengthening the psoas and realigning the vertebrae. Yin Yoga poses like Saddle can help to release and lengthen the iliopsoas but it also arches the spine which may not be a good idea for her. Dragon could stretch the psoas without moving the spine. She could try those and see how she feels, but since she is under medical care now, I would only suggest these so that she can talk it over with her doctor and see what he thinks.

There are many causes of back pain, so again, i will not presume to remotely diagnose your student. Spondylolisthesis has many causes and I do know of one student who suffers from this because of her career as a gymnast. But, is this really your student's problem? It would be easy enough to find out: an Xray or MRI will tell her. If this is the case, the next step is to figure out why it happened and then work out a therapy for her based on how advanced it is. Strengthening the lower back and some physical therapy may be useful, but she would want to avoid extension of the spine, especially in a Yin Yoga manner.

I would encourage you to read this post on spondylolisthesis specifically. This longer post may also be helpful.

Finally, any doctor or health care provider is just one part of your student's advisory team, just as you are. In the end, she is the one flying her plane and she needs to take full responsibility for getting better. She should listen carefully to her doctors, etc, but if she doesn't feel comfortable with what she is hearing, she should seek other opinions. A good resource for people with lower back disorders is the work of Dr Stuart McGill and his books and DVDs. They are a bit technical, but not beyond the ability of most people to understand.

Cheers
Bernie
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    YinYoga.com Forum Index -> General Yin Yoga Topics All times are GMT + 8 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group



© 2006-2017 yinyoga.com Please view our Terms of Use page for copyright and copyleft information.