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The effects of long held stresses on connective tissues

 
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Bernie



Joined: 23 Sep 2006
Posts: 888
Location: Vancouver

PostPosted: Mon Apr 25, 2016 1:37 am    Post subject: The effects of long held stresses on connective tissues Reply with quote

Here is an article by Helene M. Langevin where she discusses her research into long held (~30 minute) stresses on connective tissues and how it can cause a remodelling of the tissue and the architecture of the fibroblasts. She also discusses a mechanism that may reduce pain, which may be how acupuncture works.

From The Science of Stretch May 1, 2013, in The Scientist.

    Ongoing studies in my lab are addressing why the fibroblasts change shape in response to sustained stretching. So far we have found that the changes are associated with a large-scale relaxation of the connective tissue. We also saw that the fibroblasts initiated a specific Rho-dependent cytoskeletal reorganization that was required for the tissue to fully relax. Rho is an intracellular signaling molecule known to play a role in cell motility and the remodeling of cell-surface proteins that connect the fibroblast to its surrounding matrix. The molecule's involvement in fibroblast shape change suggested that the cells are able to reduce the tissue tension by adjusting how strongly and where they are gripping the surrounding connective tissue or muscle. In addition, we found that the shape change is also associated with a sustained release of ATP from the fibroblast. Within the cell, ATP acts as fuel, but outside of the membrane, ATP can function as a signaling molecule. Extracellular ATP can be converted to other purines such as adenosine, which can act as a local analgesic, thus providing a possible cellular and physiological mechanism to explain the pain relief experienced by some acupuncture patients.
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YuangYoga



Joined: 04 May 2017
Posts: 12
Location: The right place

PostPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2017 12:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

awesome, I got lost towards the end but got the gist of it. Thanks for the share =D
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